A blast from the past…

Huh. I’m in the process of collecting links to all my old ProfHacker posts into a single page on my site, and I came across this one: Got Milk? Using Remember the Milk for Task Management from way back in 2010. I’d totally forgotten that I’d ever written about RTM, or that it had been around for so long.

Anyway, finding the post reminded me that @ismh has been (still is?) an RTM user, which made me think of this forum, which made me smile.

Edited to add: It also reminded me that I was once an Android user…

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I always enjoyed ProfHacker @acavender – are you posting similar material on another site these days?

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Thanks, @quorm!

Not really, no. I’m working on getting amycavender.com up and running, but I don’t know yet how regularly I’ll be posting, or just what I’ll be posting about.

Also, a shout-out to @ryanjamurphy for making me aware of Blot — it’s fantastic!

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I’m a fan of ProfHacker, too. Nice to put a username to a blog, @acavender!

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I used RTM for ages, but I’ve been on Todoist for most of the past 4-5 years.

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I assume that was when you discovered that you were lactose intolerant, which made getting things done a real pain.

::rimshot::

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I completed 12K tasks in RTM last year…

Still love it, except for some serious sync issues and lack of (automatic) dark mode.

Sticking with it through serious sync issues… that’s true courage, right there :slight_smile:

Still calling it my “trusted system” (GTD), but the trust did decrease a bit because of the sync issues.

The sync issues mainly occur on the iOS devices; I can mostly work around those by logging out and in again, when I notice such an issue.

Migrating to another service would be such a pain, I think… (so much stuff in there, so many automations)

I could not use that product just because of its name and association …

I don’t recall where I read it, but someone wisely suggested that each of us should have a simple blog. Every article you write for someone else, every informative social media post you hammer out, every question you answer in-depth, and every contribution you make to a message board should be turned into a post on your blog so that you have it forever, so that it’s searchable, so that you can link to it in the future.

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… Maybe, but on the other hand I would have a hard time using all my fingers to add up the tip-based blogs that have proven helpful over and over. Howard Oakley is one … now, give me a few months and I’ll think of number two.

Good blogs take a lot of work. Bad blogs take a lot of ego. Since there is more ego in the universe than hard work, the latter category rules.

After a journey through many tools before and after, I am back to RTM, often via an iframe embed into my Obsidian daily note.