Software to track ISP speed and uptime?

Does anyone have any recommendations for software to track ISP outages and speed? What I’m looking for is something that will just run a speed test or ping test (ideally both) every so often to keep track of how well ISP is functioning. We’re thinking of switching to a different provider (lucky to have 2 in our neighborhood), so we’ll have both for a few weeks and I wanted to keep track of if one is more stable than the other. Happy to pay for it if it works well and isn’t some sketchy malware!

I used Network Logger Pro when I changed to a new provider and needed to have a record of outages. The ISP was a brand new provider in the area and was having some outages in the first few weeks (now totally stable and reliable). You let it run in the background and it will alert you to outages.

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That looks perfect, thanks!

We’ve heard mixed things on the new provider for outages, but speed is better. So for current one we see downloads of 20-120 and uploads of 3-10, but new one is gigabit fiber. So trying to see if the speeds are truly better but stability is good enough. I.e. if we see multiple outages in a few weeks we know it isn’t great! Otherwise we can assume probably about the same ballpark.

I’ve got a bash script running on my raspberry pi which creates a CSV file of the data. It’s old school, but solid!

echo "$(date '+%Y%m%d%H%M'), $(ping -c1 google.com | sed -nE 's/.+, ([0-9.%]+) packet loss/\1/p')" >> connection.log

This does only track uptime, but that works for me.

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I use Speedtest for quick one time testing. I get the free version so there are ads. Here’s the test I just ran off my phone

Screen Shot 2020-12-16 at 4.40.59 PM

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Many routers have an option to log all events. Some even sand a notification when the internet was down and back up again.

For example Synology RT2600AC has the option to create a Quick Connect account and enable DDNS service. This will alert you when the internet connection to your router is down and back yo again.

Many routers allow you to enter a DDNS address (for example one obtained via DYN). Next you can use one of the services online to check if the URL is up. Be careful not to ping to often as the IP address from the service might be blocked.