135: Don't Eat the Frog, with Jesse J. Anderson

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This book has been the most helpful and practical book I’ve found for living with ADHD.

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I’ve not listened to the episode yet - so perhaps I shouldn’t comment. But I will anyway.:slight_smile:

My experience is that eating the frog is draining and wrecks the rest of the day. Until something/someone energising comes along.

Now to listen to the episode - open mindedly - to see if the panel agrees.

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I love the increased amount of interviews on Focused and MPU lately.

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Here’s a link to a list of criteria associated with ADHD.
It’s important to think of this (and others like it) as just a guide. If these symptoms or others make life difficult for you or someone you care about, there are people who can help. And know too that you or they aren’t the only one.

Feel free to DM me if you’d like.

https://www.addrc.org/dsm-5-criteria-for-adhd/

This is a great YouTube channel mentioned in the podcast.

That list of symptoms says I don’t have ADHD. It doesn’t matter if I do or don’t, so long as I can handle being me whoever I am.

But the thought it triggered was ‘is there actually any such thing as “neurotypical”?’

I know it’s tempting to put people in boxes. But putting people into “not normal” boxes - however granular - isn’t helpful. I think it’s better to think of neurodiversity as pervasive. The motivation for that is to accept people with all their proclivities.

So I viewed this episode slightly detached. But I still stand by my previous comment: “Eating The Frog First” is unhelpful for me - but for different reasons, I think, than for people with ADHD.

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Agree that the frog can be unhelpful for some/many.

And I agree with this. While neatly putting people in boxes helps the “organiser” I doubt it helps the “person in the box”. As an example, for me, eating the frog is the best thing I can do. It does empower and energise me and also reinforces I have done the “big thing” that day. It can also allow me to think “Whew!, I did the big thing. If I do nothing else today …” and that can happen too (nothing else gets done that day! :joy: )

One of my favourite quotes from Psychologist, Carl R. Rogers is: “Can I let myself enter fully into the world of his (sic) feelings and personal meanings and see these as he (sic) does?”

…and that is how I would like to view people, from their perspective and their experience and the thoughts and feelings on those areas. (Not saying I’m any good at this, it is an aspiration which I fail at constantly!)

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I don’t really want to make this about me - but such a topic relies on personal experience so here goes…

… Yes, I too get the boost from “I did the big thing” but it - in my case -comes at a cost: Not much later at all I feel drained.

There’s a general “we pay for our good news with bad news slightly later” thing going on. I guess the answer is to understand our own dynamics - and plan accordingly.

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Absolutely, I wasn’t intending to diminish your experience, just conveying my own.

We are all different. And for me, I’m trying to, as you put well, understand our (my) own dynamics.

I’ll stop there as I may be taking the thread off topic and that isn’t/wasn’t my intention. :slight_smile:

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