Monterey:Big Sur::Snow Leopard:Leopard

Just look at the map of California. None of the tech press seems to have picked this up, but it looks pretty clearly intended as something along the lines of the Mountain Lion:Lion or High Sierra:Sierra upgrade.

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I hadn’t noticed that. Interesting!

But Monterey does seem to have a number of new features, no? And the hallmark of Snow Leopard was no new features, just under-the-hood improvements. Or at least, that’s the conventional wisdom.

Or Yosemite and El Capitan, of course.
Viticci was talking about the return to a tik-toc cycle on one of his podcasts, I think it was App Stories.

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Definitely seems like a snow leopard year for Mac and iOS. Which is a good thing indeed.

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If Monterey proves as long-term solid as Snow Leopard was, I for one will be seriously impressed!

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I doubt that as there are important changes on the horizon that will need to be addressed in coming macOS versions, first and foremost cellular internet connections and how that will impact all different kinds of processes in macOS.

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I really hope the next MBPs have 5G, but I’m not holding my breath based on the leaks.

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In terms of WWDC type announcements, “Low Data Mode” for macOS would be the tipoff that we’re getting 5G Macs. I haven’t heard anything about that this year.

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How hard can that be? Port some drivers from iOS and add a network interface to the list of existing ones. I’d be very surprised if the software had been keeping Apple from building cellular Macs.

Existing Mac software, both Apple’s and third party, assumes that it has an unlimited data connection whenever it’s connected to the internet (hence the need for tools like TripMode). You don’t want a cellular enabled Mac deciding that because it has a (cellular) internet connection now is a good time to download your Photos library. Before Apple releases a cellular-capable Mac, macOS will need features like the way iOS treats a cellular connection differently from WiFi or Ethernet.

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Frankly, it seems nearly there with the Location feature in System Preferences–> Network. All it needs is a way to change location automatically.

I think it needs to go well beyond that. Consider that on iOS not only can you limit access to cellular data at the individual app level, there area also APIs that apps can plug into so they can be well-behaved on cellular data (things like waiting until you get back on WiFi to download podcast episodes, for instance).

TripMode covers app-specific controls & should be easy to replicate or buy….and / or everything can be posted easily from iOS.

Little Snitch / TripMode is great for nerds, but Chris is right that this needs to be much more granular. I believe iOS even has the option to turn off cellular access for each app in the Settings app, so that they can’t be any “mistakes”.

The difficult thing to achieve is not “Access / No Access”. There are several ways around that.

The difficult thing is “Unlimited Data vs Low Data.” For example, if I click on my Inbox in my email app, it’s reasonable to assume that I want to check for new mail (unless there’s a manual “Check for New Mail” button). But what about checking all of my other folders? On low data, you probably don’t want that to happen.

Do I want iCloud/Google Drive/Dropbox/etc to sync continually on low-data? Probably not, but what about if I click on a folder or start to edit a document?

Then, of course, we’ll get to have that whole conversation about using ad-blocking to save bandwidth again.

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