2FA for Apple ID

  • I’m curious how many people use 2 factor authentication to log into their Apple ID, not just on iOS, but macOS as well.
  • Also, what anyone think’s of the experience - good or bad?

2FA all the way!

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If you enable 2fa would that not be the same for ios and macos?

For me it works like a charm. No issues at all, and get’s out of the way most of the time, so not difficult to live with at all

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Care to elaborate on why? :slight_smile:

There are plenty of single platform people out there, so I wanted to hear both sides of it.

Ah ok, got it, thought I might have read it wrong.

No worries - and who knows? Maybe my wording is off :thinking: :stuck_out_tongue:

I try to use 2FA wherever it’s available.

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Ahh… noted…
Thanks. :slight_smile:

So do I, it is your last defence. Even brute forcing your password won’t help a criminal get in. They’d still need your 2nd factor.

So; use it wherever it is available (even if it’s sms verification, even that is better than nothing)

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All the way, you kind of have to.

I’ve resisted so far. :wink:

I have 2FA on all accounts I care about and have the option to do so.
I equate it to having a passcode on my phone- it’s there, it’s simple and it provides protection to help keep my stuff more secure- to quote a Merlin Mann’ism who am I serving by not putting it on?

Why, do you want the break the news that your APPLE ACCOUNT HAS BEEN HACKED ?
And the clickbait machine can run overdrive?

Enabling Apple 2FA creates a Secure Enclave that will protect your iCloud account and the devices that are connected to it. It works very well and is very secure.

To get better protection you need to take much more elaborate steps, use a Yubikey etc etc

2FA on Mac and iOS for many many years and no issues.

Initially, when I signed up, I found it odd that I couldn’t generate the code myself. For example, I use 1password and it generates the code… so I copy and paste the code. With Apple 2FA, they send the code to other device and I have to type it in… Not a big deal but little less convenient

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I started using it because Apple requires app-specific passwords for third party apps that access iCloud data and you can’t generate those unless your account uses 2FA. Or at least that was the requirement when I gave BusyCal access to my iCloud calendars a few years ago.

It’s mostly fine. I do wish that Apple were better about remembering that I’d just 2FA authenticated myself instead of making me go through it again and again as I move between their domains (iCloud to ID management, for example) and it would be nice if it were better about remembering that I’ve already authenticated a machine or browser instead of so often requiring 2FA between sessions. Other than that it’s okay.

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I thought Apple had started requiring 2FA everywhere awhile ago. If you’re not seeing it on the Mac, you may have told it to ‘Trust This Computer’ when you signed in with it.

There is no singular view of what protection is required. That’s a highly subjective topic. So there is no one-size-fits-all answer to such questions.

Also, you’d also have to trust the provider you’re working with, e.g., Apple, Dropbox, etc. I’m not saying I don’t; I’m just saying people often talk about security while using someone else’s servers.

Nope. They still prompt you on every upgrade (even minor point releases it seems!) but you can still choose to not upgrade the security, a move I completely agree with - offering the option to not upgrade it. I would be unhappy if it was forced on me. However, I admit they are obscuring the option to opt out to some degree.

Then buy a system 76 and unplug your modem